Tips for Project/ Flat Rate Invoicing

Tips for Project or Flat Rate Invoicing
I recently had a question come my way from a new freelancer about pricing client work. She’d already created a draft invoice for the work and was looking for feedback on whether she was pricing appropriately and thinking comprehensively about the work.

While I didn’t provide her with feedback on her specific pricing, I did send some quick thoughts on the way she was itemizing the tasks and describing the scope of the project and thought they’d be worth sharing here for others who might have similar questions.

She had her invoice itemized out something like this:

Service Time Cost
Domain & Hosting Setup; WordPress Install* A hrs at $X/hour $YYY
Theme Research & Installation, Minor Customization B hrs at $X/hour $YYY
Content Entry (5+ Pages, Multiple Image Galleries) C hrs at $X/hour $YYY
*Cost of domain registration, hosting, and WordPress theme not included

The Good Stuff

There are a lot of good things about the way this is set up already!

Itemized Services

I was happy to see this person listing out various components of the service they’re providing the client, breaking things out into groups of similar tasks. This really helps clients understand what they’re paying for and also makes sure everyone is on the same page regarding project scope.

Research Time Included

It’s also great that she included research into themes as part of the project scope, since in this particular project she was helping the client find a suitable pre-made WordPress theme to use. It takes time to match up client requirements to available themes and that time should be accounted for and clearly delineated in the invoice or estimate.

License and Recurring Costs Not Included

I was also very happy to see that she had specifically noted that recurring costs (hosting, domain registration) and the cost of the theme are not included in the quoted total. I feel pretty strongly about not including those types of costs in base invoices and instead having the client have ownership over their accounts and pay the actual cost of whatever licenses are needed so that they have those things in their name.

I also usually note in my invoices that web font license costs aren’t included, as that’s another semi-hidden cost that the client should be aware of from the outset and that I won’t cover myself.

Areas for Improvement

While the info this freelancer included was a great start, there are also some definite areas for improvement and further specificity.

In fact, my general rule with estimates and invoices is to be as specific as possible and also to note that things that aren’t listed aren’t included. This helps protect me against scope creep and also makes sure the client knows they should ask early on in the process if they’re looking for something specific that isn’t listed on the estimate.

In this example, I had three suggestions for things to improve on.

Avoid Relative Terms

The phrase “minor customization” raised a big flag for me, as it’s unclear what “minor” would include. A lot of the time, things a client may think are “minor” actually aren’t as straightforward as they may seem, so it’s best not to use relative or subjective terms and instead be really clear about what you’re going to customize and what the limits are. I might specify “customization of colors, fonts, and header graphics” or something like that.

Include Hard Limits

I was also concerned by content uploading including “10+ pages” and “multiple” image galleries. This is another place where you want to be really specific and provide caps rather than minimums or general terms (“up to X pages” and “up to X galleries with up to X images each). Otherwise you are going to end up hating life when you’re uploading image 125 of 160 on your 15th gallery page.

Overage Plan

While I don’t actually include this in my estimates and invoices (it’s in my contract instead), I also prompted this freelancer to consider what she would do if she went over the hours she listed or if the client needed more than outlined in the project scope.

I don’t include hour indications in my estimates unless it’s a line item specifically for hourly work, as the hours are irrelevant to the client when I’m really quoting on a project or output basis. If I go over my predicted hours getting to the agreed-upon scope, that’s on me and it doesn’t change the quote for the client.

On the flip side, if the client ends up wanting more than what we agreed upon, it’s good to be clear about how you handle that. For me, I say that I’m ok with adding to scope but the client has to know that that increases the cost of the project and may also impact the time frame.


Overall, this freelancer was starting from a good place with her invoices and just needed a few small changes to make things more clear and concrete for both parties, which ensures a much smoother process overall.

  1. Chrys

    Thanks for this post. It really helps.

  2. Thanks so much for sharing this! It was incredibly helpful and really thought out.

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